Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
M6
Arnhem
1452

Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk

Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk

A little wooden church had already stood on the site of the Eusebius church in the 9th century. Like most of the churches from that time, it was dedicated to Saint Martin. The abbey of PrĂ¼m (in the neighbourhood of Aachen) administered the church and all its property. In the subsequent centuries, the church was rebuilt in stone.

Eusebius Church
In the 15th century, the church suffered a decline in the number of churchgoers. It was therefore decided to build a completely new church, which would not only compete with others, but would also rival the two-centuries-older St. Steven’s church in Nijmegen. Construction started in 1452 on the church square next to the old Maartenskerk, so that mass could be held as normal.

Iconoclasm
A century later, the church was ready. But in 1579, Protestant groups took control of Arnhem and also of the Eusebius church. The practice of the Roman Catholic faith was banned and the Eusebius church suffered the fury of iconoclasm that year. Many beautiful sculptures and other sacred items were destroyed. The relics of Saint Eusebius were brought to safety at the last minute.

Interior
The interior of the church is a beautiful example of Late Gothic architecture. The imposing tomb of Duke Charles of Gelre, dating from 1531, still stands within. The armour that he wore during the many jousting tournaments hangs there too. And the bones of Eusebius, enclosed in a beautiful silver reliquary, now lie safe in the treasury of the Walburgis church.

Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
Arnhem – Eusebiuskerk
m06-nl_lo
2:37