Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
P7
Putten
-1600

Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate

Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate

The Schovenhorst Estate lies on the eastern edge of the town of Putten. This enormous country estate was intended as an arboretum and laboratory for research into species of trees from all over the world. Its founder, J.H. Schober, imported seeds from every corner of the globe for researching whether or not they would grow in the Veluwe region. The estate also has fourteen burial mounds dating from the Bronze Age.

J.H. Schober
Schober was a solicitor, an enlightened mind, who concerned himself with issues of great national importance, such as economic development. It was his opinion, that the savage landscape of the Veluwe region could be a source of great wealth, if it were turned into woodland. So in 1848, he bought a piece of heathland from the municipality of Putten for approximately one thousand guilders. Within fifty years, his initiative had proven so successful that he became revered nationally and internationally for his achievements.

The Dutch State Forestry Service
Schober was an advocate for the establishment of a national umbrella organisation that would be responsible for the cultivation of this wild terrain. In 1888, the Dutch Heathland Company (Nederlandsche Heidemaatschappij) was established, of which he was governor. His plea for state intervention in silviculture was such that in 1899, the Dutch State Forestry Service (Staatsbosbeheer) was established. His son-in-law and successor, Dr. J. Th. Oudemans, saw little usefulness for the savage Mother Nature, but he did appreciate her beauty. He joined the group of people who founded the Society for Preservation of Nature Monuments (Vereniging tot Behoud van Natuurmonumenten) in 1905. However, his contributions did not lead to the cultivation of the Speulderbos and Sprielderbos forests, which were later acquired by the Dutch State Forestry Service in 1918.

Burial mounds
The Schovenhorst Estate has a number of gardens, with collections of tree species from different regions and countries around the world. There is also a forest surrounding these gardens that provides shelter to 14 nationally-protected burial mounds dating from the Bronze Age. In 1893, a bronze sword was found in one of the burial mounds: a burial offering for the deceased. The sword dates from the period of 1600-1400 BC and is on display at the local museum ‘De Tien Malen’ on the Schovenhorst Estate.

Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
Putten – The Schovenhorst Estate
P7 Landgoed Schovenhorst
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