Wageningen – Surrender
L52
Wageningen
1945

Wageningen – Surrender

Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender

In the first week of May 1945, many talks took place between the German occupiers and the allied forces. The Germans were willing to cooperate in allied food transports but were not willing to surrender. The end of the war nevertheless suddenly became closer when news of Hitler’s suicide came out.

Official surrender in Hotel De Wereld
On 4th May 1945, Field Marshal Montgomery took the official surrender of the Wehrmacht’s units in north-west Europe at his headquarters on Lüneburger Heath in Germany. Then, on the 5th May 1945, whilst Germany had already officially surrendered, General Foulkes, commander of the 1st Canadian Army, decided to draw up a separate surrender document. He summoned the German general, General J. Blaskowitz to Hotel De Wereld in Wageningen to sign the treaty. Initially, Blaskowitz sent his chief of staff, lieutenant-general P. Reichelt. However, he was told that this was not sufficient and that Blaskowitz had to come himself. At four o’clock that afternoon, Blaskowitz came to the hotel. Prins Bernhard, commander-in-chief of the Dutch Interior Forces was also at the meeting, along with a large number of reporters and cameramen. When Blaskowitz was handed the conditions of his surrender, he requested 24 hours delay in signing the documents. On 6th May 1945, The Netherlands was free.

Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender
Wageningen – Surrender

De capitulatie van de Duitsers

NL 52 capitulatie
5:19